Federal Attorney General Federal Attorney General ordered to pay for plane.

Attorney-General must pay for narco-plane

Mishandling the seizure of a plane in a drug trafficking case will cost 271 million pesos

Mismanagement in the seizing of an aircraft used to smuggle drugs will cost the federal Attorney General’s office (PGR) 271 million pesos (US $13.2 million).

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A Rockwell Sabreliner mid-size business jet was seized in 2000 as part of a drug trafficking investigation involving its two pilots. Two years later, they were absolved of all charges because the PGR had “altered the physical state of the aircraft, and those alterations prevented it from being used as evidence in the criminal process.”

The PGR was supposed to return the airplane to its rightful owner, the firm Servicios y Reparaciones Aeronáuticos, but instead it was added to its own fleet.

In 2006, the jet was dismantled and sold for scrap for 70,000 pesos (about US $6,400 at the time).

In 2008, the owner of the plane filed a legal complaint against the PGR and six years later the Supreme Court ordered an investigation to determine if there had been “illegal administrative activity.”

In November 2015 a federal court ordered that the PGR pay 271 million pesos in damages and losses caused to Servicios y Reparaciones Aeronáuticos.

Because the PGR neglected to appeal the court’s decision in a timely manner, the ruling is now considered final.

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Litigation experts and Senators interviewed by the newspaper Reforma agreed that the PGR must now find out which officials were involved in the handling of the case and its appeal.

“They must review who was in charge of this case . . . to find those responsible within the Attorney General’s office. There’s more to this than just the PGR paying up,” said Rodolfo Félix Cárdenas, former Attorney General of Mexico City.

At the time when an appeal to the federal court’s ruling could have been filed, Adriana Campos López was employed as head of the PGR’s legal affairs department.

She was later promoted to an inspector’s position by the Attorney General Raúl Cervantes.

“[Campos] let the time for an appeal go by, and she has a very serious administrative responsibility . . . who knows if she intentionally let it happen,” added Cárdenas.

The president of the Commission of Justice in the Senate condemned Campos’ promotion.

“It is unacceptable that instead of facing the consequences after such a serious offense, the civil servant was rewarded. The Attorney General must carefully analyze what happened there,” said Fernando Yunes.

Francisco Rivas, president of the National Citizens Observatory, said such cases happen often, not only at the federal level but under the watch of the state Attorney Generals’ offices as well.

“There is a major flaw in the way the authorities act: protocols define one thing and the [Attorney General’s] public prosecutors decide another.”

“This can be explained not only by the lack of training, expertise and supervision of the civil servants, but also by the lack of a culture of legality,” added Rivas.

Source: Reforma (sp)

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  • K. Chris C.

    Thou shall not steal the CIA’s planes.

    An American citizen, not US subject.

    • Mela Pelaez

      mexicans are also american citizens. Mexico is not in Asia but in America

      • Steve Galat

        True, from Sonora to Patagonia we are ALL (not just US citizens) “Americans” in this hemisphere. That said, there’s yet another form of US corruption called “Civil Forfeiture” which, in the case of this wayward aircraft, may now have migrated to Mexico. Fascinating the evil tentacles and subtleties of the US Drug War — for two generations a Continuing Criminal Enterprise of complicit DEA, FBI, Coast Guard, Border Police…..no shame on EITHER side of The Rio Grande

        • Garry Montgomery

          Well, the U.S.A. hi-jacked the term “American” and applied it to its citizens (actually “subjects” before Trump) but while Mexicans are “Americans” they’re not American “citizens”. They are Mexican citizens and in the broader sense “Americans”..

  • Rex Justin

    “There is a major flaw in the way the authorities act: protocols define one
    thing and the [Attorney General’s] public prosecutors decide another.”

    “This can be explained not only by the lack of training, expertise and
    supervision of the civil servants, but also by the lack of a culture of
    legality,” added Rivas.

    So, If you are prosecuted by a Big Hairy Arm Attorney General, what ever you do, don’t bend over to pick up his Gavel because as per Mexican Law, he can follow his desires and not the Law!

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