Cárdenas: executed last night in Texas. Cárdenas: executed last night in Texas.

Peña Nieto condemns Mexican’s execution

Last-minute efforts fail to halt lethal injection of convicted killer

President Enrique Peña Nieto last night condemned the execution of Mexican national Rubén Cárdenas Ramírez by the state of Texas.

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“I express my firm condemnation of the execution . . . which violates a ruling by the International Court of Justice,” the president tweeted after Cárdenas was executed by lethal injection last night despite last-minute efforts by Mexican authorities to obtain a delay.

The United States Supreme Court yesterday refused to review the case.

Mexico fought the execution on the grounds that Cárdenas had been denied consular assistance from his government, in contravention of international law. The killer’s lawyers also wanted to see new DNA tests conducted because, they said, the initial testing was now obsolete, which left doubts about his guilt.

Cárdenas, 47, was convicted of kidnapping, raping and killing his 16-year-old cousin in 1997.

Mexico’s consul general in Texas said the case was not about culpability. “. . . this is not an issue of culpability or innocence but about respect for human rights and due process,” Carlos González Gutiérrez said.

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The Foreign Affairs Secretariat (SRE) said in a statement it “strongly protested” the United States’ failure to comply with the international court’s ruling that mandated it to review and reconsider Cárdenas’ case.

“The government of Mexico opposes the death penalty as it considers it one of the most basic human rights violations as well as a cruel and inhuman punishment that erodes the dignity of the people,” it said.

Cárdenas made no statement before he was killed, but his family read a letter from him later. “I will not and cannot apologize for someone else’s crime, but I will be back for justice. You can count on that!”

He has claimed he was high on cocaine at the time of the murder.

The family of the victim expressed relief. “Words can’t begin to describe the relief it feels to know that there is true peace after so much pain and sorrow,” her sister said in a statement released by prison officials.

Source: Reforma (sp), BBC (en), New York Daily News (en)

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  • TioDon

    Yeah, this is what President Enrique Peña Nieto should be worried about; a brutally murdered girl’s killer getting, after 20 years, his just punishment. Maybe he should be focused on the totally crime ridden country he’s president of.

  • David Nichols

    Every Mexican I know would personally kill this pendejo if he raped and killed their daughter…
    Texas just did what any loving family would do to a rapist and murderer if given the chance…!

    • Parque_Hundido

      Speak for yourself. Not all of us are knuckle dragging Neanderthals.

      • David Nichols

        No, you’re right, there are those, such as yourself, who can only aspire to the level of the Neanderthals…
        Educated people would have discerned that I didn’t “speak for myself” I specifically referred to “every Mexican I know”
        if you don’t have the cojones to kill a monster who rapes and kills your daughter, I feel sorry for your family…
        Your overcompensation for your obvious feelings of inferiority is affecting your worldview.
        Methinks thou doth protest too much…!

        • Parque_Hundido

          I can only hope you live in Texas, along with the other deplorables.

          • David Nichols

            Ahhh, “deplorables”
            now I understand, a Hillary Clinton devotee–nothing more need be said about the genesis of your failed ideology…

          • Parque_Hundido

            LOL. Here we have a man (?) who claims that all loving, caring people would want a vengeance killing.

            You are, in fact, a deplorable.

  • gil morency

    new trend ??? save the murderers ??

  • kallen

    “The government of Mexico opposes the death penalty as it considers it one of the most basic human rights violations as well as a cruel and inhuman punishment that erodes the dignity of the people,” But yet Mexico allows its people to be slaughtered by the cartels, the country to be plundered by the uber-wealthy and raped by the politicians. Mexico’s statement is more than a false pretense of caring. It is simply laughable, hollow and utterly dishonest.

    • Parque_Hundido

      If the cartels were legal, you’d have a point. The Mexican government may be guilty of hypocrisy but the US can’t even be bothered to pretend to have high moral standards.

      • kallen

        Your reply is so typical: Any criticism leveled at Mexico (this is the Mexico News Daily) is instantly returned with puerile remarks about the US’s faults and the reason for such returns is the always the same: Mexican’s (especially the macho males) can’t handle the truth that Mexico is a not what it claims to be. It is a 3rd world country masquerading as a 2nd world country. It has no rule of law, little social capital and a largely uneducated populace. If it wasn’t for the oil wealth, it would rank somewhere among the nations of sub-Saharan Africa.

        But let me address your point specifically: What does the illegality of the cartels have to do with my point? The Mexican government rules the country jointly with the cartels (though the cartels probably really pull the strings). The fact is Mexico government is effete by choice therefore they must assume culpability in the cartels’ murder of its citizens.

        • Parque_Hundido

          You’re mistaken. Your point was met with criticism of your poor logic and, afterwards, with a commentary comparing the official positions of the two countries. Mexico is hypocritical, the US can’t even muster the moral authority to be hypocritical.

          You seem to struggle with the distinction between state and government. The cartels may be de facto members of the government, but they are *de jure* excluded from the machinations of the state. In Mexican law, killing is wrong, full stop. In the US, that is not the case. The executioner is a paid employee of the state.

          As long as I’m offering you a civics lesson, let me help you with your history. “First world” refers to a market led, representative republics that gravitated around the US and, specifically NATO. “Second world” meant command economies with centralized and – usually – authoritarian governments, such as that of the Soviet Union. “Third world” mean non-aligned with either the NATO/US alliance on the one hand or, on the other, China, the USSR or Warsaw Pact countries. First, second and third world doesn’t mean “first class, business class and coach” or “rich, middle class and poor”, as you mistakenly used it in your post. Please correct your usage going forward.

          • LosOjosRojos

            Typical Mexican elitist, condescending rant. 1st world , 2nd world, 3rd world ..who gives a crap? Your criticism of the US justice system is quite comical seeing how Mexico has NO judicial system. Criminals are in control especially in the education system and the government milk cow called Pemex. Fix your own house Mexico before you criticize others. And your juvenile name calling i.e. ignorant fool, most ignorant of Americas proves my first sentence.

          • Parque_Hundido

            Ouch. Looks like I touched a nerve.

            Which is it? Are all Mexicans corrupt, violent fools? Or are we elitist pedants? Please make up your mind.

            Are you mad that I reminded the poster of the actual meaning of the words he used? Or are you just mad that someone you believe to be a Mexican is correcting an obviously ignorant Anglo?

            I’d love to hear more about your vast knowledge of the Mexican judiciary. You obviously know so much! Could you tell me about the labor courts? Maybe you could tell me about the system of family law that overturned laws in BCS recently. Or maybe you also know much more about US law too. Tell us about the administrative judges who put people in jail for failure to pay parking tickets. Please, regale us with your vast and obviously superior knowledge of all things related to law.

            “Fix your own house before you…” You might want to read that sentence you wrote. Now read it again. Now think about the United States. Think about Roy Moore. Think about the state of Texas, where the Board of Education mandates teaching that Moses is among the “Founding fathers” of the United States. Think about Citizens United. Think about the endless succession of cuts to the IRS, allowing fewer and fewer audits. Repeat these actions until the light bulb goes off in your head.

          • LosOjosRojos

            Rant much?

          • Parque_Hundido

            Touchy much?

          • DreadFool

            Parque Fundido?

      • Dudley Sharp

        No one has ever disputed that this breach of consular protocol occurred nor that the rapist/murderer and his attorney could have, promptly, spoken to the consular office at any time, had either one of them wished to.

        They didn’t.

        The VC states: “Realizing that the purpose of such privileges and immunities IS NOT TO BENEFIT INDIVIDUALS (my emphasis) but to ensure the efficient performance of functions by consular posts on behalf of their respective States”

        This case has had 20 years of super due process, inclusive of countless reviews of the VC issue, in this case, and many others, and the courts have found that Texas fully complied with the due process of law and may, justly, execute this rapist/murderer.

        From the International Court of Justice (ICJ) decision:

        ” . . . the appropriate reparation in this case consists in the obligation of the United States of America to provide, BY MEANS OF ITS OWN CHOOSING (my emphasis) , review and reconsideration of the convictions and sentences of the Mexican nationals referred to . . .; and “- unanimously finds that, should Mexican nationals nonetheless be sentenced to severe penalties, without their rights under Article 36, paragraph 1 (b), of the (VC) having been respected, the United States of America shall provide, BY MEANS OF ITS OWN CHOOSING (my emphasis), review and reconsideration of the conviction and sentence, so as to allow full weight to be given to the violation of the rights set forth in the (VC), taking account of paragraphs 138 to 141 of this Judgment.”

        Texas chose to provide super due process and no more, for this and other horrid murderers, inclusive, primarily, of our own horrid US national rapist/murderers.

        Make no mistake, when Austin based Mexican Consul General Gutierrez stated: “we will continue tirelessly protecting our nationals” he is not speaking of the overwhelming majority of wonderful Mexican nationals in the US, but, instead, he’s making a promise to the most vile criminals, as this rapist/murderer.

        Based upon recent polling, I suspect 80% of Mexican nationals would support execution in this case.

        May the rest of us not forget the human rights of Mayra Laguna.

        • Parque_Hundido

          You’re literally making this up. I’m not sure where you lifted these quotes, but their poor quality speaks volumes about your judgement.

          This has nothing to do with consular protocol. Nor with “super due [sic] process.

          The next time you attempt to fake a source, you’d do well to make sure you understand the words you’re using.

          Again, nothing is quite as loathsome as an American who feels entitled to give others lessons about the rule of law.

          • Dudley Sharp

            All the quotes are, easily, verified as true and accurate and all of which were published, within my op/ed, Commentary: Why consular rights were not an issue in death row case, which was published 11/9 in the Austin American-Statesman

          • Parque_Hundido

            You realize that your comments appear to refer to some other article. Perhaps it’s one in your head, but if it’s not, you haven’t specified the source.

            Also, I don’t read op-Ed pieces written by semi-literate deplorables.

  • Parque_Hundido

    I’m no fan of Peña Nieto but on this point, they are right.

    Killing is wrong, period. And given the well known deficiencies of the Texan justice system, any execution in that state is unconscionable.

  • Dudley Sharp

    OP/ED Austin American Statesman

    No Concern For the Human Rights of Rape/Murder Victim, 16 year old Mayra Laguna
    Dudley Sharp

    ======
    Edited Version, published 11/9/17
    http(COLON)//www.mystatesman(DOT)com/news/opinion/commentary-why-consular-rights-were-not-issue-death-row-case/J83pqWNgPhslJZCOb6NVPP/
    ======

    RE: OP/Ed Submission Rebuttal to:
    A sad day for human rights in Texas, OPINION By Carlos González Gutiérrez – Special to the American-Statesman, 11/6/17

    From: Dudley Sharp

    Austin based Mexican Consul General Gutiérrez presented a highly distorted version of human rights.

    16 year old Mayra Laguna was kidnapped, raped, tortured and murdered by her cousin, Mexican national Ruben Cárdenas-Ramírez, a crime for which this rapist/murderer was, justly, sentenced to death.

    Gutierrez is complaining that it is the rapist/murderer whose human rights are violated. Gutierrez showed zero interest in the human rights of Mayra.

    If anyone is undermining human dignity it is Gutierrez.

    Gutierrez states that “(the rapist/murderer) was denied the right to due process of law, as he was not granted prompt access to consular assistance.”, which proves that Gutierrez is not even aware of true violation of the subject Vienna Convention (VC), which was that the rapist/murderer was not informed that he had the right to speak to the Mexican Consulate, if he wanted to. That’s it.

    No one has ever disputed that this breach of consular protocol occurred nor that the rapist/murderer and his attorney could have, promptly, spoken to the consular office at any time, had either one of them wished to.

    They didn’t.

    The VC states: “Realizing that the purpose of such privileges and immunities IS NOT TO BENEFIT INDIVIDUALS (my emphasis) but to ensure the efficient performance of functions by consular posts on behalf of their respective States”

    This case has had 20 years of super due process, inclusive of countless reviews of the VC issue, in this case, and many others, and the courts have found that Texas fully complied with the due process of law and may, justly, execute this rapist/murderer.

    Gutierrez left out some crucial details of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) decision:

    ” . . . the appropriate reparation in this case consists in the obligation of the United States of America to provide, BY MEANS OF ITS OWN CHOOSING (my emphasis) , review and reconsideration of the convictions and sentences of the Mexican nationals referred to . . .; and “- unanimously finds that, should Mexican nationals nonetheless be sentenced to severe penalties, without their rights under Article 36, paragraph 1 (b), of the (VC) having been respected, the United States of America shall provide, BY MEANS OF ITS OWN CHOOSING (my emphasis), review and reconsideration of the conviction and sentence, so as to allow full weight to be given to the violation of the rights set forth in the (VC), taking account of paragraphs 138 to 141 of this Judgment.”

    Texas chose to provide super due process and no more, for this and other horrid murderers, inclusive, primarily, of our own horrid US national rapist/murderers.

    Make no mistake, when Gutierrez states: “we will continue tirelessly protecting our nationals” he is not speaking of the overwhelming majority of wonderful Mexican nationals in the US, but, instead, he’s making a promise to the most vile criminals, as this rapist/murderer.

    Based upon recent polling, I suspect 80% of Mexican nationals would support execution in this case.

    May the rest of us not forget the human rights of Mayra Laguna.

  • DreadFool

    the pen-ultimate irony.

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