enrique krauze Krauze: worried about Trump.

Trump represents risk, says Mexican historian

Enrique Krauze among those worried Trump's 'alarming statements'

Some prominent Hispanic intellectuals have signed a letter in which they refuse “to remain silent about the alarming statements” made by United States presidential hopeful Donald Trump.

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Galvanized by Mexican historian Enrique Krauze and U.S.-based Cuban intellectual Carmelo Mesa-Lago, 67 people signed the “Declaration of Hispanic Intellectuals, Scientists, and Academics against Trump’s Xenophobia”.

The letter was written in rejection against the anti-immigrant position taken by Trump, denouncing the Republican candidate’s discourse, charging that it appeals to xenophobia, chauvinism, political intolerance and religious dogmatism.

Interviewed by El Universal, Krauze explained that raising a voice could well serve as a way to warn about the risk presented by Trump, while trying at the same time to show Americans that everyone who lives in the U.S. shares a culture and a language and works hard for their own betterment.

“The letter was Carmelo’s idea. He discussed it with me and we began working on a draft. After the editing was over, we shared it among about a hundred people and had a good response. Some didn’t want to sign it for different reasons; some of the reasons were good, others worthy, others not so much, but the feedback was generally positive,” said Krauze.

When Trump was first introduced as a presidential candidate, he said, it seemed like a joke, another celebrity deciding to run for president. “As time went on, he has proved that is not the case. His message isn’t a joke, nor is the reception given to him by a significant part of the U.S. electorate.”

Krauze believes xenophobia and racism aren’t as widespread as the Trump campaign has shown. However, “the combination of a society with these traits and a candidate like this is worrisome,” said the historian.

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Krauze said he is conscious that intellectuals wield very little power, but trusts that what little authority —intellectual, artistic, scientific, moral, academic— they might have will be enough to be meaningful, and count as “a small gesture.”

“This isn’t but a grain of sand. We can’t buy a page in he New York Times or the Wall Street Journal, although we have been covered by American, Mexican and Spanish media outlets. We hope this is enough to reach the hearts and minds of those undecided Republicans, to convince them that Trump is a suicidal option, unworthy of the liberal and democratic tradition of the United States.”

Krauze hopes the letter has a lasting influence, effecting change and inspiring new voices to express their opposition to Trump and the Republican party.

“Trump has dragged the discourse to the racist and xenophobic right, and it will remain there. If whichever candidate is chosen to represent the Republicans wishes to gain the support of their own electorate they will have to move their stance to the same position, to the far right spectrum of the argument.”

The letter follows:

The undersigned – Hispanics who occupy academic positions in the United States, as well as intellectuals, artists and scientists from Mexico, other Latin American countries and Spain – cannot remain silent in the fact of alarming statements from the candidate to the Presidency of the United States, Donald Trump.

Since the announcement of his candidacy, Mr. Trump has accused Mexican immigrants of being criminals, rapists and drug traffickers; and has promised to deport 11 million of them and build a big wall along the border with Mexico. Trump’s hate speech appeals to xenophobia, sexism and political intolerance; it recalls historical campaigns against other ethnic groups that led to millions of deaths. Physical attacks on Hispanics and public assertions that Spanish should not be spoken in public have already occurred.

Mr. Trump’s verbal assaults are not based on tested facts, but only on his personal, baseless opinions. Not only does he disdain Hispanic immigrants, but he also exhibits a dangerous attitude toward his opponents, stigmatizing them as stupid or weak.

He has insulted and expelled a prominent Hispanic reporter from a press conference after an uncomfortable question and made sexist comments about female interviewers, while his supporters and personal bodyguards have attacked peaceful demonstrators.

The expulsion of Mexican immigrants would be catastrophic for states such as California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas, where Mexicans carry out most manual work. In California our immigrants harvest 200 agricultural products, serve in hotels and restaurants, and collect garbage. California is the leading producer of wine in the country and the principal destination for tourism. These sectors generate $70 billion per year. Without Mexican workers, the economy of the state, followed swiftly by the rest of the country, would go to ruin.

Several of the undersigned are Hispanic immigrants who have been well-received by this great nation and contributed through their various endeavors toward greater knowledge, scientific progress, entertainment, and prosperity for all Americans.

Mr. Trump’s conduct is not worthy of a candidate to the Presidency of the United States, the most powerful country in the world. All of us condemn his behavior and hope that the American people will no longer tolerate his absurdities.

Source: El Universal (sp)

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  • Hispanic female for Trump

    This letter is so stupid. A presidential candidate wanting immigrants who obey our laws is a blessing for the United States and its citizens.

    • Beau

      Hispanic female for Trump: Your comment is very stupid as well. One thing is to have a candidate who wants immigrants to obey the law, and other is to have a fear monger, egotistic moron running for president calling Mexican immigrants “rapists and drug dealers” – See the difference?

      • Albert Wynder

        Beau. Correction. Read the transcript or listen to the recording before you make unfounded comments. Trump was referring to illegal Mexican immigrants and not Mexican immigrants (legal) in general. You are falling victim to the arguments of the open borders people who want to confuse these issues by lumping both legal and illegal immigrants in the same category. You would do better to be a little more informed before posting unsubstantiated comments on a public site.

        • Beau

          Albert. Correction. Let me just say that it’s not your place to critique other’s opinions on public sites. You can disagree. but it is not your business to interfere with other’s opinions. I stand by my OPINION. Like I stated, one thing is to have a Candidate who is advocating for illegal immigrants to obey the law (which I totally support) and another is having an idiot stating that Mexico only send criminals, drug smuggler’s and rapists to the USA. It looks like you did not watch Trump’s video and your post is not necessarily based on fact or knowledge.

    • PintorEnMexico

      Illegal immigration from Mexico, (what I like to call spicy Canada) has been in decline since 2007.
      Over the same time period, the number of unauthorized immigrants from
      Asia, the Caribbean, Central America and a grouping of countries in the
      Middle East, Africa and some other areas grew slightly. It’s been well
      discussed in other threads on MND that illegal immigrants are not a
      serious crime threat, that they tend to be much more law abiding (other
      than crossing illegally) than the population at large. Lumping them into
      a class of rapists and criminals is just demagoguery at it’s best. As
      far as protecting the boarder from terrorists, the fence Trump proposes
      is just laughable. Homeland security considers homegrown militia groups
      to be the highest terror threat. In the past 25 years there have been 29
      people committing acts of terror on US soil. 24 came from outside the
      US. The other 5 were born in the US. The 24 foreigners entered the US by
      plane via New York, Ft. Llauderdale, Miami, Newark, Orlando, Washington
      DC, Cincinnati, and Los Angeles. NONE of them crossed from Mexico. That
      Mr. Krauze wrote his letter is barely news. The content of the letter
      is certainly opinion. While I’m delighted to see Mr. Trump and the other
      dwarfs mud wrestling for the GOP ticket in such a way as to piss off
      Latinos, women, and other large voting blocs, what alarms me most as a
      permanent resident of Mexico is that the good people of Mexico might
      lump me into the vast minority of my countrymen/women who answer polls
      in one way but will likely actually vote in another. Since they aren’t
      familiar with the circus that is primary election politics, they tend to
      see the media coverage of the car full of GOP clowns as actually
      representative of US policy, present or future. I like to refer them to
      this MND story, the cover of which shows my girlfriend taking a whack at
      a Trumpiñata…:
      http://mexiconewsdaily.com/mexicolife/librarians-whack-trump-for-july-4/

  • TioDon

    Wow…for a bunch of so-called “intellectuals” none of them seem to know the difference between “legal immigrant” and ” ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT”. You boys need to look that up..

    • I believe the word you were looking for was documented and undocumented, but if you are publicly spouting off your ignorance, chances are the nuance of those selected words will be lost you. Criminal law is not the same as immigration law. The actions of criminals are illegal. In immigration law it is undocumented.

      • Albert Wynder

        The term “undocumented” has been kidnapped by the New York Times and illegal immigrant advocacy groups. The correct LEGAL term is illegal. And be the way, crossing the border into the United Staes without proper documentation is a criminal offense. Your argument is the first I have heard about a difference between criminal law and immigration law. But I must congratulate you on this new rationale for open borders. I am certain several illegal immigrant advocacy groups will be equally grateful for this ne excuse to encourage the Obama administration to further violate the laws as established by the U.S. Congress.

        • TioDon

          thanks, Albert, I was gonna respond but you did a much better job than I would have….

        • Justice Kennedy (appointed by Ronald Reagan) disagrees. He wrote “As a general rule, it is not a crime for a movable alien to remain in the United States.” In a country that believes in due process of the law, calling an immigrant illegal is akin to calling a defendant awaiting trial a criminal. The term illegal is also imprecise. For many undocumented people — there are 11 million in the U.S. and most have immediate family members who are American citizens, either by birth or naturalization — their immigration status is fluid and, depending on individual circumstances, can be adjusted.
          http://ideas.time.com/2012/09/21/immigration-debate-the-problem-with-the-word-illegal/

          • Albert Wynder

            The immigration status of 12 million illegal immigrants is “fluid” only in the
            minds of those who advocate on their behalf and apparently yours as well. The United States Criminal Code 8 USC 1325 and the Immigration and Nationality Act specifically define the requirements for entering the United States legally as well as other details pertaining to immigration. Justice Kennedy offered an opinion with regard to the “fluidity” of immigrant aliens (in the legal codes cited above). In this regard, he does not speak for the United States Congres nor the Ameticsm (legal) people. The law is the law no matter how open borders advocates choose to twist and bend it to suit their political agendas. It would serve your political position better if you advocated for a pathway to citizenship or at least legal standing for this group of immigrants rather than trying to somehow gloss over or negate their illegal status by referring to that status as “fluid.” No one, not even the Obsma administration buys that argument. And it only serves to galvanize the already substantial opposition to legalizing these people. The law is the law until Congress changes it or the Supreme Court declared it unconstitutional and not amour of verbal chicanery is going to alter it.

        • Your attack mentioning the NY Times was “Ditto-speak” for attacking all liberal and intellectuals. The problem with attacking intellectuals is that they are actually smarter than you. I’ve cited a Reagan-appointed Supreme Court Justice who disagrees with your perspective. If you reply with your opinion, you’ve lost unless you are more versed in law than a Supreme Court justice. The NY Times uses the term because it is the correct term. There are not liberal words and conservative words, just as there are no liberal facts and conservative facts. There are words and there are facts and you get them both wrong.

          So here’s a definition and a source … The term ‘undocumented immigrant’ refer to foreign nationals residing in the U.S. without legal immigration status. It includes persons who entered the U.S. without inspection and proper permission from the U.S. government, and those who entered with a legal visa that is no longer valid. Undocumented immigrants are also known as unauthorized or illegal immigrants.

          http://definitions.uslegal.com/u/undocumented-immigrant/

          So as you can see, your reply was only complimented by Tiodon and given the thumbs up by people in your conservative echo chamber of hate.

          • Albert Wynder

            As I have stated earlier, the opinion of a U.S. Supreme Court Judtice does not constitute legal standing unless he/she was writing with the majority. Please site, if you can, the specific case in which this term became legal. The United Stares Criminal Code and the Immigration and Nationaluty Act actually call illegal immigrants non-resident aliens. Climb down off your high horse and do some in-depth research before you decide that anyone is writing from the conservative perspective on this issue. When did it become political to enforce the law? Use all the generalized terminology that you like, decide in your mind that my position is conservative or not, call my comments ditto-speak if you like. The end result is the same – 12 million illegal immigrants without legal status are living within the sovereign borders of the United States. As of this moment, they have no legal status nor have they the tight to reside in the United States. Now call me a racist or a xenophobe or some other negative term but that does not alter the truth or the law. Mexican and Soanish intellectuals may be highly intelligent and well educated, as you correctly indicate in your response. But they do not vote in the United States and therefore their opinions on this matter are irrelevant.

          • Güerito

            The Associated Press in 2012:

            “But what about the cases where we do write “illegal immigrants”? Why not say “undocumented immigrants” or “unauthorized immigrants,” as some advocates would have it?

            To us, these terms obscure the essential fact that such people are here in violation of the law. It’s simply a legal reality.

            Terms like “undocumented” and “unauthorized” can make a person’s illegal presence in the country appear to be a matter of minor paperwork. Many illegal immigrants aren’t “undocumented” at all; they may have a birth certificate and passport from their home country, plus a U.S. driver’s license, Social Security card or school ID. What they lack is the fundamental right to be in the United States.

            Without that right, their presence is illegal. Some say the word is inaccurate, because depending on the situation, they may be violating only civil, not criminal law. But both are laws, and violating any law is an illegal act (we do not say “criminal immigrant”).

            http://www.ap.org/Content/Press-Release/2012/Reviewing-the-use-of-illegal-immigrant

            AP’s 2013 change banning “illegal immigrant” is part of their P.C. newspeak, that orders writers to use “addicted to alcohol” rather than “alcoholic,” or “diagnosed with schizophrenia” rather than “schizophrenic.”

            In other words, AP banned “illegal immigrant” for political reasons. It has nothing to do with the legal issue involved.

  • The Trump candidacy is galvanizing the underlying xenophobia and racism of the US. While he may get the nod by the GOP, his brand of hate won’t likely win the general election. But what it says about the US is disturbing. The white majority is having a hard time coming to terms with their shrinking majority. When a privileged group perceives their privilege is coming to an end, they become very dangerous. These are the forces the US must confront. I welcome a more colorful US.

    • It’s a numbers game … in 2012, 71% of the Latino vote went Democrat. And that’s a growing demographic. 73% of Asians, 60% of young people, 55% of women, and 55% of people with post graduate studies.

      The GOP won with men (52%, but obviously not me), with whites (59% but again obviously not me), people from 45-64 (51%) and over 65 (56%). Trump plays to the GOP base without expanding it. The GOP cannot win without growing their base. This is not my opinion, rather it is math.

      Oh, the one way the GOP can win is by suppressing the vote, basically democratically win an election via anti-democratic means.

  • Albert Wynder

    If a group of Americans wrote an open letter opposing a Mexican presidential candidate, there would be endless whining and crying from Mexicans about their national sovereignty. There would be demonstrations in front of the U.S. Embassy exhorting Americans to stay out of Mexican politics. So why is this letter OK? Whether or not Donald Trump becomes the Republican nominee for president (highly unlikely), it is for American voters to decide and not a group of so-called Hispanic intellectuals. As has been pointed out in many places in the media, Trump’s inflammatory comments were directed toward illegal immigrants. No one has a problem with Hispanic immigrants in the U.S. as long as they legally entered the country. But open borders advocates, such as this group, like to confuse the two groups for their own political agend. Additionally, a letter like this one makes not difference to those who oppose Trump’s candidacy but it only further galvanizes his supporters and maybe even persuades some undecided Republican voters. So what has been accomplished? Net gain? Zero. And please, let’s not confuse Jorge Ramos’ publicity stunt with news reporting, much less journalism.

  • raoul contreras

    Wynder and other posters here miss the point of the letter by Krause and others. In his announcement for office Trump made Mexico and issue, Mexican trade and industry, too. He made the Mexican people an issue. He charged the Mexican government with pushing rapists and other criminals across the border with official action, as official government policy. This is not a question of intellectuals and academics interfering with an American election for Trump is not yet running for President of the USA. He’s running for a political party’s nomination. Trump is like a flesh eating bacteria in the American political system. And as it takes all of our resources to combat flesh eating diseases, it also takes all resources to combat political scum like Trump. Trump made Mexico, Mexicans and Mexican industry and trade issues he is running on and that has nothing to do with legal and illegal aliens. The man hates all Mexicans and he doesn’t even know where the border is; in that he is like the people who support him who couldn’t find Mexico or Canada on a map when they were seniors in high school. Thanks to Krause and the others, attack Trump for what he is a phony ignorant fraud who has stolen millions of dollars in four bankruptcies. No major candidate for U.S. President has ever filed bankruptcies for himself or his companies in an effort to steal monies. Trump admits he “made millions” in his four bankruptcies.

    • Beau

      100% right. Trump admitted to using the USA Bankruptcy laws to his advantage and to make money out of his failing businesses. Frances Dryden sounds like a typical right-winger Trump supporter.

  • Francis Dryden

    Seems Spanish and Latino intellectuals only read and watch left leaning media… wow they sound stupid.

    • Albert Wynder

      Mr. Contreras. If you honestly believe that the Mexican government does not encourage the poor and yes even some criminal elements to emigrate to the United States, you are either seriously naive or tragically deluded. The second largest source of revenue in Mexico comes from remittances sent to Mexico by both legal and illegal Mexican nationals living abroad. Without this gigantic source of revenue that requires absolutely not one peso of expense on the part of the Mexican government, the economy would faulter and thousands more would live below the poverty line. Your characterization of Donald Trump as “flesh eating bacteria” is dangerously close to the bigoted rhetoric of Trump himself as his comments relate to Mexican undocumented immigrants. In addition, your comments about American’s inability to find Mexuco or Canada on the map are neither supported by evidence nor are these acerbic comments germane to the rest of your commentary. (Clearly you are unfamiliar with the sad state of education here in Mexico if you intend to hold this country up as an example of quality in learning.) Why is it not possible to have a civil discussion about these issues? Why is it that those on the radical left and radical right always revert to name calling and insults rather than focusing on the issue at hand? Do you really presume to hold yourself above Donald Trump when you engage in the same level of prejudiced and muddled thinking as Trump himself?

    • PintorEnMexico

      You sound like the whiney GOP candidates crying over getting tough questions from debate moderators, including those by Meghan Kelly. If they can’t take the heat, they shouldn’t try getting into the kitchen.

      • Francis Dryden

        At least they can answer them… anymore worn out clichés Pintor! I have one for you – it involves sex and travel.

        • PintorEnMexico

          Both activities I happen to enjoy! And I would appreciate it if the GOP wouldn’t be so concerned with the former and spend more time in the latter…

  • Trump’s anti-immigration stance? Trump’s stance is anti-illegal alien, which is quite different. Confusing the two is a common trick of collectivists. I certainly hope Trump does not get elected president or even nominated by the Republican Party — Cruz is much better — but his popularity is based on the American population’s having it up to here with open borders and millions of us Mexicans entering their country without permission.

  • DennisCHP

    Mr. Krauze, at least in the United States an undocumented or documented person has the right to talk about the government. I live full time in Mexico as a “Permanente Residente” and it is against the law for me to make any negatve comments about the Mexican Government.

    • Güerito

      It’s not against the law for you to make negative comments about the Mexican Government. This is a myth fostered by Mexican-Americans and ex-pats who want to silence critics of Mexico.

      You risk deportation if you openly join a political cause down here or participate in public demonstrations or marches. As long as you avoid that, you’re OK.

      But you’re right about the double standard, with illegal immigrants in the US engaging in political protests, testifying before the US Congress, etc.

  • Henry Wilson

    Given the fact Trump has promised to begin deportation proceedings of the more than 11 million Mexicans living illegally in the US I can see why most are starting to feel some “risk.” Question to my Mexican neighbor: “Why do your people have no respect for our laws? Answer: “Simple. Because they have no respect for their own.”

  • PintorEnMexico

    Illegal immigration from Mexico, (what I like to call spicy Canada) has been in decline since 2007.
    Over the same time period, the number of unauthorized immigrants from
    Asia, the Caribbean, Central America and a grouping of countries in the
    Middle East, Africa and some other areas grew slightly. It’s been well
    discussed in other threads on MND that illegal immigrants are not a
    serious crime threat, that they tend to be much more law abiding (other
    than crossing illegally) than the population at large. Lumping them into
    a class of rapists and criminals is just demagoguery at it’s best. As
    far as protecting the boarder from terrorists, the fence Trump proposes
    is just laughable. Homeland security considers homegrown militia groups
    to be the highest terror threat. In the past 25 years there have been 29
    people committing acts of terror on US soil. 24 came from outside the
    US. The other 5 were born in the US. The 24 foreigners entered the US by
    plane via New York, Ft. Llauderdale, Miami, Newark, Orlando, Washington
    DC, Cincinnati, and Los Angeles. NONE of them crossed from Mexico. That
    Mr. Krauze wrote his letter is barely news. The content of the letter
    is certainly opinion. While I’m delighted to see Mr. Trump and the other
    dwarfs mud wrestling for the GOP ticket in such a way as to piss off
    Latinos, women, and other large voting blocs, what alarms me most as a
    permanent resident of Mexico is that the good people of Mexico might
    lump me into the vast minority of my countrymen/women who answer polls
    in one way but will likely actually vote in another. Since they aren’t
    familiar with the circus that is primary election politics, they tend to
    see the media coverage of the car full of GOP clowns as actually
    representative of US policy, present or future. I like to refer them to
    this MND story, the cover of which shows my girlfriend taking a whack at
    a Trumpiñata…:
    http://mexiconewsdaily.com/mexicolife/librarians-whack-trump-for-july-4/

    • Robert Bond

      I agree with you. Trump is a reel danger and crazy. Whit him it is the 3rd World Wide War.

      • BETOXELA2015

        HEY LIBERAL TONTO LEARN HOW TO SPELL IN ENGLISH BEFORE YOU EXPRESS UNINFORMED OPINIONS. MY FATHER AND RELATIVES ENTERED THE U.S. LEGALLY FROM MEXICO TO FIND WORK AND OPEN BUSINESSES. YOUR ILLEGAL COMPANEROS COME HERE AND TAKE WORK AWAY FROM OUR MEXICAN-AMERICANS AND AFRICAN-AMERICANS, AND EVEN THOSE THAT WANT TO COME IN LEGALLY FROM OTHER COUNTRIES TO WORK. ONE YEAR WHILE TRAVELING IN MEXICO I LOST THE EXIT PORTION OF MY VISA AND THE MEXICAN AUTHORITIES CARTED ME OFF TO JAIL FOR TRYING TO OVER STAY MY VISA. IT TOOK THE AMERICAN COUNCIL IN GUADALAJARA TO SORT IT OUT. ON THE MEXICAN SOUTHERN BORDER THOSE ENTERING ILLEGALLY ARE TURNED BACK, IMPRISONED, OR SHOT! THE U.S. NEEDS TO FOLLOW THE MEXICAN EXAMPLE. VIVA TRUMP Y LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS!

        • If you suck so bad at your job that an illegal takes it then you’re not worth a damn and should be fired anyway…

        • PintorEnMexico

          I think you mean counsul, not “council.” So where did you learn English?? Perhaps you should learn how to express your uninformed opinions in the language of the country you profess to love. Viva Obama!

  • Kim Watts

    I used to think Trump was crazy until my son was murdered in Mexico. The police are corrupt, and the laws are nonexistent. I am a professor, and I have gotten no help in any justice for my son. Now, Trump is making some statements that resonate in me that Mexico is the most dangerous country in the world to America. They are selling uranium to China, they are killing their own sons and daughters, and the whole entire country is corrupt. After my son’s death, the only answer I got was it was a mistaken identity. That does no comfort to me when looking at the ashes in my home since I did not want to leave his body in Mexico. Mexican people would sell their own mothers if it meant pesos in their pockets. The sad thing is that not one person cares. Because everything in Mexico has a price, America should be very scared for its safety. Every political office in Mexico is associated with a cartel, so there is no democracy south of the border. They do not care for Americans, and they could care less if we all fail. When (not if but when) the terrorists want to cross our southern border, it will be done (has been done) for a price. There are good people in Mexico. It will take a full boycott of Mexican made and Mexican shipped products before the Mexican people are hungry enough to do something about it. American boycotting is the only way to make Mexico change. I want justice for my son, but it will not be at the hands of Mexico.

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