US expands travel warning to include tourist areas. US expands travel warning to include tourist areas.

US warns of violence in tourist destinations

Increased criminal activity, more homicides bring new travel alert

Crime increases in five Mexican states have triggered a new travel warning for Mexico by the United States Department of State, which offers a new caution about several tourist destinations.

ADVERTISEMENT

The alert cites increased criminal activity in Baja California, Baja California Sur, Chiapas, Colima, Guerrero, Quintana Roo and Veracruz, warning U.S. citizens about gun battles between rival criminal organizations or with authorities on the streets and in public places during broad daylight.

Caution is urged in Baja California, including Tijuana, Rosarito, Ensenada, Tecate and Mexicali, particularly at night.

As with several other state-specific warnings, that for Baja California says most homicides appear to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, but turf battles have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. visitors.

The warning announced that U.S. government personnel are only allowed to travel on the Mexicali-Tijuana toll highway during daylight hours.

Criminal activity and violence remain an issue throughout Baja California Sur, said the State Department, which included Los Cabos and La Paz in its warning, making the same caution about violence in tourist areas.

In Chiapas, including Palenque and San Cristóbal de las Casas, U.S. officials must now remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation.

ADVERTISEMENT

Inter-city travel at night is prohibited for government personnel in Colima, as is traveling within 19 kilometers of the border with Michoacán and traveling on highway 110 between La Tecomaca and the Jalisco border.

U.S. citizens should defer non-essential travel to the Jalisco border region, including the city of Tecoman.

There is now a total ban on personal travel by U.S. government personnel in Guerrero, eliminating the option of traveling to Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo by air.

The warning advises of an increase in homicides in Quintana Roo and has included the tourist destinations of Cancún, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Riviera Maya and Tulum in its advisory.

In Veracruz, U.S. government personnel must remain in tourist areas and are not allowed to use public transportation. Road travel should be limited to daylight hours.

The full warning can be read here. It replaces the one issued last December.

Mexico News Daily

Stories from our archives that you might enjoy

  • jwd

    The Cannibalistic manner of Mexico is feeding on itself! The Narcos that have operated with impunity for years are branching out and looking for other income. The fear of targeting tourist is receding as the government’s ability and/or will to control them diminishes. When this all begins to have negative impact on tourist, the Narcos will be looking to maintain their flow of funds. They will become more aggressive with the general population, as well as with the remaining tourist. I suspect that foreign corporations with Mexico manufacturing facilities, will be seen as sources of income in the future. I would not be surprised if second or third tier supplies to the manufacturing sector are not already targets. BTW, the idea that Narcos have not bothered tourist in the past ignores the simple fact that most all tourist areas are highly infiltrated by Narcos. There is nothing you pay for there that does not include the Narco Tax! I pray things change!

    • What a load of crap!!! I would advise you not to visit Mexico.

      • jwd

        I live in Mexico.

        My Mexican stepdaughter had a pistol held to her head a while back as she was robbed. I know several people that have been murdered in the past few years. Most of my friends are college graduates and/or business people. No one I know has not had murder, extortion, kidnappings etc in their family. A lot of things float around on FB down here. Last night my daughter showed me a video of a young Mexican having his head cut off. Very real and very graphic, including the hacking sound as his neck bone was severed. A load of crap you say? Sir, you don’t have a clue!

        • Hailey Mannering

          There remàin very safe places in Mexico for people tp live and visit.

    • Steve Galat

      True, but you realize that Narcos saturate tourist areas only to serve Americans desperately seeking to get high (someplace faraway from New Hampshire and heroin) and find temporary respite from their OWN imploding country, now a failed rogue state, a plutocracy-kleptocracy-ochlocracy whose DEA, FBI, coast guard ENABLE and PROFIT from embedded collusion with ALL cartels, mafias and corrupt régimes globally. Your own President Trump is NOT some aberrant unethical grifter — he MIRRORS YOU, your countrymen and society. You’re way behind History, ‘JWD’….time to get a grip, yo!

      • jwd

        BTW, Narco is a term used down here for organized crime which may or my not have anything to do with drugs. Business are being extorted for money down to shoe shine guys on the street and taco stands. There are large towns where school teachers pay 15% of their salaries or their families are murdered. The worst of the crime here will not directly touch gringo tourist, nor me, at least not yet. But my wife is Mexican, I have Mexican stepchildren and I will have Mexican grandchildren one day! So I see the problem through a different prism.

        Your Liberal dribbling and childish name calling suggest to me that you are neither knowledgeable about history nor what is going on in Mexico.

        • Steve Galat

          I appreciate your pardoning my ignorance of Mexican events and of history in general. My criticism of the USA was not intended to portray México by invidious comparison as “The Switzerland/Singapore of Latin America,” just that the same corruption and impunity exists in the US, only in colossal dimensions and with refined sophistication and stealth: Your whole middle class has been burgled, after all! I live in Puerto Aventuras, Q.R. and while it’s not Monte-Carlo, at certain dusks by the marina (if the light is right) it does recall Beaulieu and Villefrânche-súr-Mer. Still, I’m sympathetic to you and, soon, your grandchildren especially since you view reality through a prism of siege by Narcomantas and Knights-Templars! (No need to divulge your location….I have nothing but respect for those on the US Federal Witness Protection Program!)

        • Mike S

          I have lived in Mx and visit for long periods often. I’m not going to run on about bloody crimes committed by organized crime wars, but I find your posts grossly exaggerated. I would say 85% of Mx is as safe or safer than the US. The other dangerous 15% is well know and easily avoided. Last year about 200 American citizens were killed in Mx and 150 of that total were involved in drugs or other illegal activities. Twenty six million Americans visited Mx and a couple of million are retired there not to mention hundreds of thousands more who are there on business. That same year there were 13,000 homicides in the US. To hear you tell it, everybody there is being attacked and cowering in fear. My experience has been very different.

          • jwd

            I guess if the d

          • Mike S

            Average household income in Mx is over $800 usd a month ($14,000) pesos. Sure there is poverty in Mx but look at the homeless in every US city and look at many of the inter-cities and 20% of US children living below the poverty line. You are painting an exaggerated fearful picture. US tourists and expat retirees are not being targeted by drug cartels. Organized drug cartels in Mx will not be curtailed as long as their is a lucrative $50 billion yearly market in the US and no wall is going to stop that. The most violent cartel in Mx was spawned by our military (Zetas). There is lots of blame to go around but to get this problem under control is going to require both sides to cooperate and work closely to both curtail demand and curtail supply. Trump is aggravating the problem, not solving it. In the meantime, I have no fear of visiting or living in Mx. I use common sense and local knowledge and don’t let unfounded fear let my imagination run wild.

          • jwd

            Where are you getting those numbers from? Most folks in Mexico, that can find a job, work at or near the minimum wage which is about 87 pesos per day. That is $5 per day. My Mexican stepdaughter who just finished college as number one in her class is now teaching in a private school for 1,500 pesos per 15 days. In about one year she can take an exam and if she passes and when there might be an opening in a public school, she could see a 50% or more increase in salary. Plus public schools have additional perks. Her husband is teaching a a local private college for a similar salary. A recently retired friend was managing a factory where parts were made for BMW, the salary for employees was 87 pesos per day! I could give many more factual examples of salaries here, but I have a feeling you are living in an altered state, so there would be no point. Adios!

          • Mike S

            http://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/mexicos-middle-class-47-of-households/

            https://www.efe.com/efe/english/life/mexican-households-have-an-average-of-3-8-members-843-in-monthly-income/50000263-2666718

            Mx has huge wealth disparity and weak social safety nets so you see a lot poverty on the streets where in the US most of our poverty is hidden away in rural trailer parks, reservations, public nursing homes, older kids living at home, and big city public housing. In Mexico average household incomes usually include more that one job holder. Most manufacturing jobs pay about 350 pesos a day. The Mexican middle class is growing. If you remove car fatalities, their life expectancy is about the same as US. Not sure why your step kids are having so much trouble finding better pay. Might be the field they are in or where they live. No question government jobs in US pay more than Mx. Mx is a land of small-time entrepreneurs and a cash economy which is hard to track.

    • Güerito

      Narcos, or perhaps more properly called “former narcos,” have been extorting large corporations in Mexico, including foreign multinationals, for years now.

      • jwd

        Please expand on this, I am curious. Thanks!

        • Güerito

          Check my previous posts here on MND, particulary those dealing with organized crime and my posts in opinion pieces here on drug legalization.

          • Güerito

            Washington Post today, in a report on Acapulco, trying to get up to speed:

            – The gang members are young men who often become specialists — extortionists, kidnappers, car thieves, assassins — and prey on a largely defenseless population.

            “They kill barbers, tailors, mechanics, tinsmiths, taxi drivers,” said Joaquin Badillo, who runs a private security company in the city. “This has turned into a monster with 100 heads.”

            Violence is spreading to new places and taking many forms. In Puebla, south of Mexico City, a fight rages over the sale of stolen fuel. Beach towns such as Cancun and Playa del Carmen have been bloodied by drug killings. The battle for human-smuggling routes leaves bodies strewn along the migrant trail.

            In Acapulco, the faded playground of Hollywood stars, where the Kennedys honeymooned and John Wayne basked in the clifftop breeze, drugs are no longer even the main story. This is a place awash in crime of all stripes, where criminals no longer have to hide.

            With the loss of all-powerful cartel bosses who had tightly controlled their criminal empires, drug gangs moved increasingly into other crimes, such as kidnapping and extortion.

            https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/world/how-acapulco-became-mexicos-murder-capital/

          • Thomas Myslik

            Correct Guerito. You forgot to mention that with marijuana legalization in US, the cartels are turning to importation of worse drugs (meth, cocaine, heroin etc.). They have routes. They simply switch product. Libs, of course, never consider unintended consequences…Wall please.

        • Güerito

          The Washington Post today, in a report on Acapulco, trying to keep up with developments in Mexico:

          – The gang members are young men who often become specialists — extortionists, kidnappers, car thieves, assassins — and prey on a largely defenseless population.

          “They kill barbers, tailors, mechanics, tinsmiths, taxi drivers,” said Joaquin Badillo, who runs a private security company in the city. “This has turned into a monster with 100 heads.”

          Violence is spreading to new places and taking many forms. In Puebla, south of Mexico City, a fight rages over the sale of stolen fuel. Beach towns such as Cancun and Playa del Carmen have been bloodied by drug killings. The battle for human-smuggling routes leaves bodies strewn along the migrant trail.

          In Acapulco, the faded playground of Hollywood stars, where the Kennedys honeymooned and John Wayne basked in the clifftop breeze, drugs are no longer even the main story. This is a place awash in crime of all stripes, where criminals no longer have to hide.

          With the loss of all-powerful cartel bosses who had tightly controlled their criminal empires, drug gangs moved increasingly into other crimes, such as kidnapping and extortion.

          https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/world/how-acapulco-became-mexicos-murder-capital/

          (basically an extended version of what I reported two days ago)

  • sado_23a

    On the other hand the chances of being robbed or killed by cops are virtually zero compared to pretty much every American state.

    • frankania

      Agreed, I left the USA after being robbed 4 times in 5 years. Here in Cordoba, I have been robbed (of minor things like gas tank, camera, celfone) twice in 27YEARS.

    • Bonnie G

      This is not true. Only in states run by Democrats.

  • Stylez

    The Mexican tourist industry is in a steady state of decay.

    • Clarke

      hahahahahahahaha record numbers and expats mov ing here in droves if you dont no shit why comment oh wait let me guess a Trumptard???

      • Stylez

        as mass amounts of hotel room sit empty in Mazatlan, Acapulco and soon Cancun.The number of expats moving to Mexico has gone Way… DOWN… The last 5-10 years.

        • Dallas Autery Y Rocio Heredia

          i live in the Mazatlan area. We just had a record summer vacation season. Hotel rooms are empty this week because its the off season now until November. there is a large amount of new construction here of more hotel rooms going on right now.

        • Clarke

          Not True!! Acapulco yes there has been lots of violence there for a very long time and it is mostly a Mexican and European destination also for a long time! Numbers are way up on tourist visits to Cabo, Cancun, PV and Playa del Carman. Cabo is building a new Airport as the New one in San Jose cannot keep up with the traffic, housing prices are up about 20%, hotel occupancy is at an alltime high and there are over 8 new resorts and 11 more seeking permits, new housing developments are everywhere after years of dormancy, I have lived here for 13 years, when I moved here the population was around 30 thousand, now its around 150 thousand including the fact that during the US recession we actually got smaller for a few years.

          • Stylez

            All the building is due to drug money and corrupt political money needing to be laundered.

            Mexico is a spiraling failed state going down the drain.

      • Thomas Myslik

        I believe it’s spelled “know”.

  • djr4nger

    Very sad. I wonder what it’s going to take for this situation to improve. A people’s revolution? It’s going to be a bloodbath wrestling power out of the hands of the narcos at this point. Makes me shudder and rethink future plans for Mexico.

  • David Procter

    This warning comes from the U.S. Department of State? The State Department is part of the Executive branch of government under the control of President Donald Trump who appointed Rex Tillerson as Secretary of State and head of the Department. We know that Trump’s words cannot be trusted; he lies, and “fake news” is one of his creations. You have to consider that this warning is part of Trump’s effort to undermine U.S/Mexican relations and cast Mexico in an unfavorable light. This makes U.S. tourists stop and wonder and, perhaps, change their plans. Consequently, Trump wins.

    • jwd

      The problem for the US State Department is trying to determine the danger for US citizens based on the crimes committed against Mexicans. Killings, torture, beheadings, extortion, kidnapping, etc in states such as Guerrero is so rampant that most folks in the US cannot comprehend the danger many of these people live in. How does one predict when these crimes will target tourist. Do you err on the side of safety for the US citizen? While I still feel relatively safe as a gringo, I cannot say the same thing for my Mexican family. And I have thought for a long time that the relative safety afforded tourist will deteriorate in the future.

      BTW, these warnings were put out by Obama’s State Department as well. The Mexican government does pay attention to these and beefs up security in areas based on the reports, according to the Mexican Government.

  • mariache

    Cold…but safe. Canada is the place.

  • TioDon

    Well, thanks for the warning, State Department. So, instead of taking the family to Playa del Carmen this year I think I’ll take them to St. Louis, or Cleveland, or Detroit, or Baltimore, or Chicago……hahahaha, there are more murders in Chicago on a weekend than there are in Playa in a year. Amerika is swirling down the toilet and should look at its own ghetto sheetholes before warning people about place they know nothing about. No thanks, we’ll go to Mexico this year…..

    • Hailey Mannering

      My sentiments exactly.

      • Thomas Myslik

        You are free to go where you please (I live in Mexico and am not leaving) but why blame the state department for doing their job? Or would you be one who would complain if you went, had a problem and then blamed the dept for NOT warning you?
        Perhaps you should educate yourself on the duties of the state dept. (hint: it is NOT to warn you about travel to domestic cities.
        You’re welcome

  • Hailey Mannering

    Ģeneralizing about safety in all of Mexico is pointlesss. Yucatan state, for one, is safer than almost anywhere in USA. If Yucatan state were dangerous, why did beach tourism increase 72% last Easter? Why are massive hotels going up? Why were thère applications for 21 new hotels in
    Merida during the first part of 2017? I wonder what the motivation is for people to post that *all*of Mexico is dangerous?

    • Thomas Myslik

      Same thing occurred in Cuba in the 50’s. Then Castro came in and nationalized all that property. Your assumptions are ridiculous. (PS. the state dept was NOT generalizing. It was very specific.)

  • Rick Elizzo

    I saw the videoof the decapitation of 4 women and then the retaliatory murder of a 15 year old child and it is repulsive that Mexico has gone to extremes and total lack of morality culture and civilization

  • WestCoastHwy

    Very interesting posts on this article. Any comparison with Mexico and other countries are invalid first and foremost. Mexico is very homogeneous and very discriminate. Culturally, Mexico has not evolved and continues to support the Patron mentality; the term “Narco” is the primary example of that. During the 60s, the world was on LSD, Barbiturates, amphibians, and Cannabis. Mexico stepped up to the plate with it’s corrupt system to be one of the suppliers. Since then, the playing field has become quite crowded and more violent. Drugs are no longer the means to support this corrupted system and as jwd states, “The Cannibalistic manner of Mexico is feeding on itself!”

    The bottom feeders are what has become of Mexico’s Narco culture of which are mindless and considered armed and dangerous. The others have invested in legitimate businesses and use their Representatives to change the laws that counter their objective.

FreeCurrencyRates.com
ADVERTISEMENT