ricardo monreal Monreal: angling for the mayor's job?

Comrades in arms are now sworn enemies

The cannibalistic machinations of Mexico's Left

It was just a few days ago that Ricardo Monreal, the winning candidate in the election for chief of the Cuauhtémoc borough in Mexico City, assumed office.

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A member of the National Regeneration Movement party, or Morena, he immediately lodged a criminal complaint denouncing the appalling state in which he found the borough offices after the previous chief (affiliated with the Democratic Revolution Party, or PRD) left: the furniture was missing, as was the basic operational equipment (computers, phones, file cabinets, etc.) and, allegedly, the officials and clerks who work in those offices.

The electoral and low-blow battle between the supporters of the PRD) and those of Morena — who not long ago belonged to the same party — was brutal. Even after the elections were over, both sides accused their counterparts of cheating and chicanery.

Incredible, because both parties’ bases are the same, namely: downtown merchandizers, the thousands of peddlers who pay their quotas to well-known leaders, the different cab and bus drivers’ collectives, and all those amorphous characters that wander the central zone of the great metropolis.

Monreal tells us that he has found corruption runs deep in the borough, and that it’s his job to fix and straighten it — if he wants to have any chance to run as Mexico City mayor.

Ricardo is a seasoned, cunning and hard-working politician, one who has never had qualms about changing sides in order to stay in play: he was a deputy and governor with the PRD in Zacatecas (although his origins are with the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI), then a senator and federal deputy.

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He is now aligned with Morena and with his protector and mentor Andrés Manuel López Obrador (also known as AMLO).

How is it possible that the popular citizens’ groups such as the street peddler associations or the corrupt organizations managed by the infamous René Bejarano, that so helped López Obrador in the past, are now Ricardo Monreal’s sworn enemy?

The PRI or the PAN (the National Action Party) aren’t the enemies in the capital city. “The bad ones” are now those affiliated with the PRD, in a weird cannibalistic manner. They are first of all draining that party’s membership in order to take over its control of the Federal District.

They will then use the city as a springboard for the presidential elections of 2018, led by the party’s candidate and only leader, AMLO, who has also changed sides in the past.

Armando González is a journalist and broadcaster who lives in Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca. 

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  • Henry Wilson

    Not often does a Mexican journalist have the courage to shine the bright light on the cockroaches of Mexican politics. Too dangerous. Most of the time if you want to know what is going on in Mexico you must read foreign news media. Apparently Sr. Gonzalez is an exception. Good for him. A brave man.

  • May the left devour itself.

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