Linda Franco, inventor of a jacket that turns the body into an interface for mobile and virtual reality apps. Linda Franco, inventor of a jacket that turns the body into an interface for mobile and virtual reality apps.

9 under 35 recognized for innovative ideas

They presented their projects at a summit in Mexico City this week

Nine Mexican trailblazers were recognized Thursday at the first Latin American edition of the Innovators Under 35 Summit, sponsored by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Technology Review.

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The Mexico City summit brought together 35 people identified as the most innovative young leaders in Latin America to present their work in biotechnology and medicine, energy and transportation, hardware and software, mobile business and robotics.

During a 12-hour session the innovators, categorized as inventors, entrepreneurs, visionaries, humanitarians and pioneers by the MIT Technology Review, spokes about their projects.

Among the inventors was Javier Larragoiti, 27, who presented his project for combating obesity and climate change with a sugar substitute he obtained from agricultural waste.

Marco Mascorro, 30, told of a project in which robots were capable of managing the inventory of any establishment in real time, saving firms millions of dollars.

The third of the Mexican inventors was Manuel Piñuela, 34, who devised a method to extract the small amounts of energy that exist in the air to power the small batteries used in the world of internet of things (IoT) devices.

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There were two Mexican entrepreneurs, Ángel Sahagún, 29, and Octavio Jiménez, 23.

Sahagún designed a mobile app that simplifies financial management and banking for individuals, while Jiménez combined augmented and virtual reality, IoT and big data to maximize the productivity of business processes in real time.

The lone Mexican visionary was Linda Franco, 30, who presented her design of a jacket that turns the wearer’s entire body into an interface for mobile and virtual reality apps.

The one Mexican in the humanitarian category was Jaime Martínez, 32, who designed an innovative solar panel financing, ownership and management system that could help drive adoption of the renewable energy source in Mexico.

Alejandra Chávez, 30, and Norma Martínez, 27, were chosen in the pioneers category.

Chávez designed a system that uses biotechnology to turn everyday affordable and staple foods, such as bread and tortillas, into products capable of preventing disease.

Martínez developed a system that detects septicemia and identifies the bacteria causing the infection.

Source: El Universal (sp)

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