Timmy's, iconic Canadian fast-food outlet. Timmy's, iconic Canadian fast-food outlet.

Tim Hortons plans Mexico expansion

Iconic Canadian restaurant chain sees a thriving coffee market

Tim Horton’s, the iconic Canadian fast-food restaurant famous for coffee and doughnuts, is coming to Mexico.

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Restaurant Brands International (RBI), owner of the multinational restaurant chain, announced today it would expand into Mexico by entering into a joint venture with a group of unnamed Mexican investors.

The company did not say when the restaurants would open or how many there would be.

But RBI CEO Daniel Schwartz said in a statement that Mexico has “a thriving coffee market so we are very optimistic about the opportunity to grow the brand across the country.”

The company has been expanding recently into the United Kingdom and the Philippines.

The restaurant chain, commonly known in Canada as “Timmy’s,” was founded by and named after a former professional ice hockey player. Defenceman Tim Horton played for 24 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL).

He played his first NHL game for the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1950 and remained with the team until 1970, winning four Stanley Cups, according to Wikipedia.

Horton played until his death in a car accident in 1974.

There are some 4,500 Tim Hortons restaurants in nine countries.

Source: El Financiero (sp), Strategy (en)

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  • K. Chris C.

    “a thriving coffee market so we are very optimistic about the opportunity to grow the brand across the country.”

    Not
    from what I’ve seen. Krispy Kreme and other coffee outlets are about empty most of the time.
    Seems the wealthier Mexicans prefer the product, atmosphere and setup of Starbucks stores (myself included), and
    the poorer folks, who can afford it, do not enjoy coffee, or prefer
    instant.

    OXXO is cutting their throat with their high prices and inconsistent quality. If they would much lower their prices, and be more quality consistent, they would more than make up the revenue and profit in higher volume. Oh well.

    An American citizen, not US subject.

    • Carl Crabkiller

      The Krispy Kreme shops in Mexican airports seem to be doing well, on flights from GDL to MXC the overheads are crammed with cases of donuts.

      • K. Chris C.

        Good to hear.

        The stand-alone shop near me does not seem to be doing well, nor are the small-operator coffee shops/cafes.

        Of course, that’s all based on my casual observation. I could be, and hope, that I am wrong in my opinion of the Mexican coffee market.

        Cheers.

        An American citizen, not US subject.

  • Baconsizzla

    Was my understanding they drink REAL COFFEE in mexico and other places all over south america and the carribean, not the crap we drink at tim horton, ! I have had rral coffee and Tim Hortons althougg doingnvery well for them selves, to me is not real coffee

  • Come on down. I like coffee. I like donuts. I like capitalism.

  • Happygirl

    As a Canadian citizen and a proud british subject (nod to K. Chris C.) I am a big fan of Timmy’s and I actually look forward to eating there. It is known in Canada as having a consistently excellent product and a good selection of products. It is a franchise system with owner operators (it is not cheap nor easy to get a coveted franchise) Each “Timmys” looks almost exactly the same – like the photo. It serves not just coffee and doughnuts…there’s soups ( like grandmother use to make, selection varies daily), fantastic sandwiches on freshly made rolls, wraps, muffins, bagels (might have a problem in Mexico with their everything bagel as it has poppy seeds), cookies, pastries…juices, teas, and water. Their coffee is great and liked so much they sell it in their stores so you can enjoy it at home.They are good corporate citizens – they have/own several summer camps which they sponsored free camps for poor kids, they have fund raisers for local hospitals, they hire the disabled and new immigrants and offer flexible work schedules for their staff (moms with kids, students, seniors) and their staff are happy so they must pay them well above minimum wage. They sell reusable cups that you can get refilled, you can have china cups or plates with your eat in food, they recycle…their customers not so much…their paper cups litter Canadian roads.They are a staple in Canada – good price, good food, good service and clean…even the bathrooms. Will it work in Mexico? I doubt it…they have a tried and true system that everyone must follow…no short cuts, no short changing the customer, honesty, integrity and pride in service and product. I do not own their stock, have no franchise, don’t work for them and receive no payment for this review…just a loyal customer.

  • Epazote

    Tim Horton’s, an iconic Canadian fast food chain, is also a prime example of how complicated any boycott can become in Mexico, as it is typical of today’s multi national businesses. Once an exclusively Canadian family owned firm started by that famous Hockey player of the same name. Today it is based in Miami following the sale of the company to multinational interests, including US interests.
    From Wikipedia: on “August 26, 2014, Burger King agreed to purchase Tim Hortons for US$11.4 billion; the chain became a subsidiary of the Oakville-based holding company Restaurant Brands International on December 15, 2014, which is majority-owned by Brazilian investment firm 3G Capital.On August 26, 2014, Burger King agreed to purchase Tim Hortons for US$11.4 billion; the chain became a subsidiary of the Oakville-based holding company Restaurant Brands International on December 15, 2014, which is majority-owned by Brazilian investment firm 3G Capital.” Now who own the Brazilian investment firm is a matter of research.
    Their announced intent at the time was to take the company multi-national. Something they are accomplishing as exhibited by this announcement. Glad to have them here as they are always good for a quick and relatively healthy lunch (if you can resist the donuts).

    File this one under “Food for thought”. Lets hope they use all Mexican produce in their soups and salads etc.

  • Happygirl

    Don’t get me wrong I love Mexico…but I am a realist. I find franchise stores are the worst stores to shop in, in Mexico…the staff are poorly trained and customer service is non-existent and the food quality, taste and quantity is different (KFC, Burger King, Dominoes Pizza) I love Mexican stores/restaurants run by the owner…they want me to come back. I stand by my statement.

    • Epazote

      Quote: Will it work in Mexico? I doubt it…they
      have a tried and true system that everyone must follow…no short cuts,
      no short changing the customer, honesty, integrity and pride in service
      and product. End quote.
      So it seems there is some confusion between the first statement as quoted above, and your reply to my challenge. If I understand you correctly, the actual issue is not the initial implication that Mexicans would somehow short change the customer, but that instead you have discovered while in Mexico that American franchise food and service actually really is bad as it seems and not what you remember? That instead that you have discovered you prefer Mexican food and service? Well slap yourself on the head (D’Oh) then pat yourself on the back that you have made that discovery all adults make when they finally realize marshmallows and string licorice really don’t taste as good as remembered from childhood (or other previous life). Next time, may I suggest trying not to denigrate the people you claim to love in the process of discovering your taste buds.

  • Dbearas

    Look out mx the gringos are coming.

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