News
Participants were given red, white and green T-shirts and organized to form a Mexican flag. Participants were given red, white and green T-shirts and organized to form a Mexican flag. Indeporte CDMX

14,000 boxers break Guinness record with world’s largest boxing lesson

The Mexico City event smashed the previous record set in Russia

More than 14,000 boxing enthusiasts came out swinging in Mexico City on Saturday to set the Guinness World Record for the largest ever boxing lesson.

The 14,299 person turnout at Mexico City’s central square, the zócalo, far exceeded the previous Guinness record for the largest boxing lesson, which was set in Russia in 2017 with 3,000 participants. However, it was still below the 19,000 boxers who registered to take part on Saturday.

The crowd formed a Mexican flag after being directed to one of three sections of the zócalo, having received a green, white or red t-shirt prior to the event. A fourth section just off the square was open to people who hadn’t registered.

Just before 8 a.m. more than a dozen Mexican boxing champions and former champions were introduced to the crowd, including the former unified heavyweight champion, Mexican-American Andy Ruiz. Boxing legend Saúl “Canelo” Álvarez promoted the class online, but didn’t make an appearance.

Boxing students in front of the National Palace.
Boxing students at the zócalo. Indeporte CDMX

After the national anthem, three champion boxers – Ana María Torres, David Picasso and Mariana Juárez – took the lead for three 10 minute exercises. Budding boxers broke sweat practicing their squats, uppercuts and jabs, among other exercises.

The participants were able to catch their breath at 9:10 a.m., when the class came to a close.

“Here are the future champions and world champions. Go Mexico!” said Torres, referring to some of her 14,000 new boxing students.

“It’s an honor to be with great Mexicans. It has been proven again that a united Mexico can do it … We are going for more championships,” enthused former featherweight and super featherweight world champion Óscar Valdez.

The event’s adjudicators stipulated that the class had to last at least 30 minutes and that all participants had to follow the instructions of the teachers and remain constantly active, without taking a break for more than 20 seconds. The students also had to stay in their assigned position and were prohibited from using their cellphones.

With reports from Excélsior

Reader forum

The forum is available to logged-in subscribers only.