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The president of a nightclub owners association said that clubs should refrain from playing music that encourages a sexualized style of dancing known as perreo, or twerking. The president of a nightclub owners association said that clubs should refrain from playing music that encourages a sexualized style of dancing known as perreo, or twerking.

Bars urged to turn off reggaeton because they foster disrespect for women

The Puerto Rican music genre has boomed in popularity around the world

Bars and nightclubs shouldn’t play reggaeton or other styles of music that encourage violence and a lack of respect for women, according to the head of an association of nightclub owners in Morelos.

Humberto Arriaga Cardoza, president of the ADICE nightclub owners association, recommended that bars and nightclubs in the state capital of Cuernavaca remove such music from their playlists.

“It’s just a recommendation; it will be up to the owners of nightclubs and bars to pay attention to the musical preferences [of their establishments] because the lyrics [of reggaeton] encourage a lot of things such as violence [against women] and … femicides,” he said.

Arriaga also said that nightclubs and bars should turn off music that encourages a sexualized style of dancing known as perreo, or twerking.

He said he agreed with Mexican singer-songwriter Aleks Syntek, who has been highly critical of reggaeton for generating a culture of disrespect for women.

Yo perreo sola, or I twerk alone, by recording artist Bad Bunny.

 

Originating in Puerto Rico in the 1990s, the music style is popular around the world, especially in Latin America. Among the best known reggaeton artists are Daddy Yankee, Bad Bunny and Maluma.

Arriaga said that his recommendation is not directed at members of the association he heads because they don’t play music that incites violence and fosters disrespect for women. He said he wanted all bar and nightclub owners to be more responsible to avoid damaging the reputation of Cuernavaca and frightening off Mexican and foreign tourists.

“We must recover the status we [previously] had because as citizens we watch the downfall of the municipality with sadness,” he said.

That remark referred to violence in recent years in the Morelos capital, located about 80 kilometers south of Mexico City.

Arriaga also said that the coronavirus pandemic has taken a heavy toll on entertainment venues in Cuernavaca.

“Unfortunately there’s no night life [at the moment]. The majority of the traditional discos closed their doors due to the pandemic but the idea is that the city will have that [economic] activity again. Now that [mayor-elect] José Urióstegui Salgado is coming in we hope that there is a strong recovery,” he said.

With reports from El Universal 

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