Tuesday, June 25, 2024

10,000 march in Guadalajara to protest violence, insecurity

A protest against violence and insecurity was attended by 10,000 people in Guadalajara on Tuesday in reaction to the murder of three local siblings.

Ana Karen, 24, Luis Ángel, 29, and José Alberto González Moreno, 32, were kidnapped from their home in San Andrés on Friday night and found dead on the Colotlán highway on Sunday morning.

Organized by the University of Guadalajara (UdeG), the march transversed two kilometers from the university rectory to the Monument to the Disappeared.

Academics, students and residents attended, many carrying photos of missing people, who number more than 12,000 in Jalisco alone, according to official data.

Rector Ricardo Villanueva Lomelí spoke to the crowd in front of the Monument to the Disappeared, lamenting the normalization of violence and demanding that the state ensure the security of its citizens.

The state Attorney General’s Office has said the murders could have been a case of mistaken identity.

Candidates from all parties seeking office on June 6 have offered comment as the case has become politicized.

At least one protester found their remarks expedient. Before the march, a banner was hung by the Monument to the Disappeared which read: “Don’t use the tragedy for your campaign.”

Source: El Universal (sp), Infobae (sp)

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