Monday, December 5, 2022

Pirates attack Gulf of Mexico oil rig, lock up crew and loot the contents

Pirates attacked and plundered an oil rig last Sunday in the Gulf of Mexico, locking up the crew while they looked for loot.

Witnesses said at least six men armed with guns and knives boarded the rig at 9:30pm and proceeded directly to the third floor to wake up the crew. After locking up workers in the cafeteria, the thieves wandered freely, looting equipment, materials, money and anything of value they could carry.

The pirates departed at 4:00 am on Monday, when the rig’s captain sent an emergency alert to authorities. The navy responded 4 1/2 hours later. The crew and company lawyers have spent this week in interviews and taking inventory of damaged or stolen items, which have still not been fully identified.

It was not the first heist of this kind in the Gulf of Mexico, where pirate attacks are becoming a growing threat to oil rigs. On March 12, President López Obrador announced that the navy would maintain permanent operations off the coast of Dos Bocas, Tabasco, to protect against pirates that have in the past attacked Pemex oil rigs.

The rig that was targeted Sunday, called Fortius, is anchored several kilometers off the shore of Campeche. When fully staffed it has a total capacity of 150 people, but it is currently manned by a small maintenance team.

The owner, Mexican oilfield services firm Oro Negro, declared bankruptcy in September 2017, and is currently in the middle of a US $900-million negotiation with debtholders over the future of five oil rigs, including Fortius.

Source: Reforma (sp)

Mergon CEO Pat Beirne (far left) and Coahuila Governor Miguel Riquelme (center) along with other company and state officials at the Mergon inaugeration.

2 foreign-owned manufacturing facilities open in northern Mexico

0
An Irish plastics company and a United States medical technology company opened new plants in northern Mexico this week.
Horacio Castilleja Albarrán during his time as an active service member, left, and in 2021, right.

Mexico’s last World War II veteran dies at 98

0
Mexico's last World War II veteran, an army radio operator and member of the Air Force squadron known as the Aztec Eagles, died on Wednesday.
Residents of San Simón de la Laguna, a small town in México state, protest the detention of six community members accused of murder, who have been awaiting trial in Valle de Bravo Penitentiary since 2018. Such dysfunction in the criminal justice system contributes to high rates of impunity.

Impunity for homicides and femicides remains sky-high, new report finds

0
For the vast majority of homicides and most femicides committed 2016-2021, no perp was convicted, according to an anti-impunity nonprofit.